Warning: file_get_contents() [function.file-get-contents]: URL file-access is disabled in the server configuration in /homepages/12/d83843876/htdocs/newlife/wp-content/themes/supernova-pro/lib/functions/supernova-query.php on line 657

Warning: file_get_contents(http://grant-adamson.me.uk/wp-content/themes/supernova-pro/lib/admin/inc/webfonts.json) [function.file-get-contents]: failed to open stream: no suitable wrapper could be found in /homepages/12/d83843876/htdocs/newlife/wp-content/themes/supernova-pro/lib/functions/supernova-query.php on line 657

Warning: Invalid argument supplied for foreach() in /homepages/12/d83843876/htdocs/newlife/wp-content/themes/supernova-pro/lib/functions/supernova-query.php on line 678
Categories

Wordblog revived

incorporating New Life

Technology tops Telegraph blogs

Shane Richmond, news editor of Telegraph.co.uk, is the paper’s top blogger. His technology blog is well ahead of any of the others published on the papers’ website, according to the Technorati rankings. Richmond is ranked 19,501 with 658 links from 160 blogs. Next in the list is the Brussels correspondent David Rennie with 321 links from 41 blogs.

This puts the top blogs at the Telegraph and the Times on a par. Yesterday Technorati showed the Times’s religion correspondent Ruth Gledhill’s Articles of Faith blog with links from two more blogs than Richmond. The Guardian has only one comparable individual blog, that of Roy Greenslade whose media blog is ranked 11,206 with 965 links from 247 blogs.

In less than a week since I collected the rankings for the Times bloggers Tehnorati seems to have been making some changes. The ranking for blogs with no other blogs linking to them has gone from 1,738,471 to 2,008,887. Gledhill, despite having two more linking to her had slipped in the rankings. My own ranking fell but has now more than recovered, largely due to the newspaper blogging debate.

So the table below does not provide a direct comparison with that for the Times I posted on Tuesday morning. I have looked at the Technorati blog for an explanation but can’t find anything. Perhaps they could post something. Also Technorati does not seem to have been picking up all the pings and I have added comments to a couple of entries.

Related posts: What is the purpose of newspaper blogs?
What is the purpose of newspaper blogs? reprise.


Telegraph blog rankings

1 Technology: Shane Richmond – 19,501 (658 links from 151 blogs)
2 Foreign: David Rennie – 76,288 (321 links from 41 blogs)
3 Foreign: Richard Spencer – 96,051 (49 links from 33 blogs)
4 Society: Melissa Whitworth – 99,164 (59 links from 32 blogs)
5 Fashion: Hilary Alexander – 149,349 (89 links from 22 blogs)
6 Foreign: David Blair – 157,081 (111 links from 21 blogs)
=7 UK: David Derbyshire – 224,713 (30 links from 15 blogs)
=7 Technology: Ian Douglas – 224,713 (23 links from 15 blogs)
=7 Foreign: Kate Connolly – 224,713 (184 links from 15 blogs)
10 UK: Ben Fenton Rank: 241,544 (43 links from 14 blogs)
11 UK: Jonathan Petre – 337,626 (19 links from 10 blogs)
12 Arts: Ceri Radford – 373,929 (35 links from 9 blogs)*
=13 Politics: Commons Confidential – 417,830 (10 links from 8 blogs)
=13 Fashion: Malika Dalamal – 417,830 (11 links from 8 blogs)
15 Foreign: Peta Thornycroft – 473,260 (18 links from 7 blogs)
16 Sport: David Bond – 544,193 (15 links from 6 blogs)
17 Travel: Francisca Kellett – 544,193 (14 links from 6 blogs) *
=18 Fashion: Clare Coulson – 639,287 (23 links from 5 blogs)
=18 Sport: Stewart Jackson – 639,287 (8 links from 5 blogs)
=18 UK: Christopher Howse – 639,287 (15 links from 5 blogs)
21 Motoring: Erin Baker – 777,647 (8 links from 4 blogs)
22 UK: David Millward – 987,541 (12 links from 3 blogs)
=23 Sport: Chei Amlani – 1,332,989 (4 links from 2 blogs)
=23 Society: The Party Blog Celia Walden – 1,332,989 (1 link from 1 blog)
=23 Travel: Robert Conway – 1,332,989 (7 links from 2 blogs)
=23 Sport: Mark Hodgkinson – 1,332,989 (4 links from 2 blogs)
=23 Arts: Tom Horan – 1,332,989 (3 links from 2 blogs)
=23 UK: John Steele – 1,332,989 (2 links from 1 blog)
=29 Foreign: Catherine Elsworth – 2,008,887 (No blogs link here) (actually regularly updated but according to Technorati not updated for 142 days)
=29 Foreign: Peter Foster – 2,008,887 (No blogs link here) Another one regularly updated by not registering on Technorati. Many comments
=29 Foreign: Toby Harnden – 2,008,887 (No blogs link here) New blog.
=29 Arts: Mark Monahan – 2,008,887 (No blogs link here)
=29 Sport: Mick Cleary – 2,008,887 (No blogs link here)
Graham Boynton — Not found by Tehcnorati but does seem to be very new.

About

View all posts by

POST A COMMENT


No Responses

  1. Charles says

    What insanity *is* this? OK, then, the Guardian’s Technology blog – which is a three-hander (myself, Bobbie Johnson, Jack Schofield) ranks 3,037 (http://technorati.com/blogs/blogs.guardian.co.uk%2Ftechnology%2F).

    Does the fact that there’s not a lone person writing it somehow invalidate it from your investigation? I’m really not understanding what you’re trying to demonstrate here. “Blogs must be individual”? Come on. Tell Metafilter. Tell Boing Boing, which is the 6th-ranked “blog” on Technorati.

    Sorry, but I think you need to set out the terms of reference of what you’re doing here. Because I’m really not getting the point of this willy-waving – or pointing and laughing.

  2. Martin Stabe » The Independent’s blogs: must do better says

    […] Remember the debate about the dubious quality of some British national newspaper blogs? It raged back in October and November, centering on Andrew Grant-Adamson’s analysis of the degree of other bloggers’ engagement with the blogs published by the Times and the Telegraph. […]

  3. BBC - Radio Five Live - Pods and Blogs says

    […] Not stopping there, Adamson-Grant began analysing the number of blogs linking, according to technorati, to first The Times blogs and then to The Telegraph’s. […]

  4. Web 2.0 Television » More Newspaper Blogs and Porpoises … er, Purposes says

    […] UPDATE: Grant-Adamson finds that technology tops the Telegraph blogs, then posts a reprise including this: I have my doubts about the slow development of blogs. If you are a journalist you need to get eyeballs on pages quickly. I rescued Wordblog from the dead in June because I wanted understand the process from the inside. In the third week it scored 2,633 hits — above the Telegraph average — and has gone on rising. Last month it was just short of 40,000. It is hard work and has to become a routine. […]

  5. Weblog - Ruth Gledhill - Times Online: Islam under fire: not surprising given stance on HMD says

    […] And a couple of surveys by technical masters of this medium have shown this blog to be number one in the newspaper blog charts of Britain. Is this survival of the fittest? Given that this blog doesn’t even come up on The Times’ own website if you do a search, as my own vicar told me this morning, and given that Technorati also doesn’t link to it and putting it into Google Blog Search only brings up gobbledegooklehptxt, it does seem something of a miracle.  I can only assume it is down to all of you, who keep commenting and linking here. So please do keep up the good and godly work, and let us religionists win the  Dawkins wars for once and for all. […]

  6. Ruth Gledhill says

    Thanks again for this and for all the others you’ve done. I am as amazed as I suspect others are by my blog’s success. It is even the more surprising, given that a search for it on either Technorati or, incredibly, The Times’ own website, fails to bring it up at all. Even Google Blog Search only brings it up in htxt gobbledegook. So if anyone, such as my vicar who was chatting to me about it this morning, tries to find it by doing an online search, they simply cannot. It is only traceable through other blogs linking to it. Given that immense handicap, its position at the top of the “er charts” is pretty remarkable, some might even say a miracle! But thank you again, I am sure these articles are more than helping to keep it up there…

  7. mathewingram.com/media says

    thing we have to an authority on blog popularity). In his look at the Times’ 37 blogs, he notes that the religion blog of Ruth Gledhill is one of the best, and the most popular according to Technorati. He also did a ranking of Telegraph blogs here, in which editor Shane Richmond’s blog is by far the winner. Some are linked to by only one or two other blogs, and some are not linked to at all. In the Times’ rankings, the bottom position was occupied by prominent British society figure and

  8. Ruth Gledhill says

    Hilarious. A Mail columnist was telling me the other day how hopeless their online operation is, but I didn’t realise quite how right she was until I saw this. And a couple of surveys by technical masters of this medium have shown this blog to be number one in the newspaper blog charts of Britain. Is this survival of the fittest? Given that this blog doesn’t even come up on The Times’ own website if you do a search, as my own vicar told me this morning, and given that Technorati also doesn’t link to it and putting it into