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Regionals ad gloom is not lifting

Johnston Press, the UK’s second largest regional newspaper publisher with 250 titles including The Scotsman which it bought this year, has seen no sign of the advertising gloom lifting.

A trading update issued today says that in the five months to June 3 ad revenues on a like-for-like basis, excluding acquisitions, were down 9.4%. This is a slight improvement on the year-on-year figures given in March.

The company blames higher unemployment and lower vacancies; lower car sales and dealer consolidation; weakness in consumer confidence and poor results from a number of high street retailers.

But property and other classified advertising continued to grow. Circulation revenues were ahead of last year and there was good growth in internet publishing activities.

Doubleclick (UK) changes name to Telegraph Media Group

The secretive Barclay brothers’ Daily Telegraph could have acquired part of the UK arm of Doubleclick, the billion dollar internet advertising business. No announcement has been made but on May 16 Doubleclick UK’s name was changed to Telegraph Media Group Limited.

The Companies House database lists the advertising business, formed in1977, with the address of 1 Canada Square, Canary Wharf, London, where the paper has its headquarters.

While there are many companies registered with doubleclick as part of their names, a Google search shows the Doubleclick group was trading as Doubleclick UK. In June last year Doubleclick was bought by Hellman and Friedman LLC, private equity investors with offices in San Fancisco, Ney York and London. Their web site says:

DoubleClick is the leading provider of technology and data solutions for advertising agencies, web publishers, marketers, and catalogers to plan, execute and analyze their marketing programs. DoubleClick’s marketing solutions – – online advertising, search engine and affiliate marketing, email marketing, database marketing, and data management – – help clients yield the highest return on their marketing dollar. DoubleClick Inc. has global headquarters in New York City and maintains 21 offices around the world. In July 2005, Click Holding Corp., a subsidiary of Hellman & Friedman LLC and JMI Equity, acquired DoubleClick in a transaction valued at approximately $1.1 billion.

In August last year an annual return was filed for Doubleclick (UK) giving the Canada Square address. The current Doubliclick group web site gives three addresses in south east England for various parts of the business but without precise company names.

Earlier today Jeff Jarvis reported in BuzzMachine on a survey of international blogging behaviour conducted by the Telegraph Media Group. He found it odd that while the story was reported in the Guardian, he could not find it in the Telegraph.

It is too late now to make phone calls to people in the UK who could elucidate, deny or confirm. The Barclay brothers, David and Frederick, who live on a tiny Channel Island bought the Daily Telegraph in 2004. The Sunday Times Rich List valued them at £1.3 billion last year.

Clearly the Telegraph needs to develop both its print and online business which is a good reason for conducting surveys and being involved in internet advertising. No doubt we will find out soon where this trail leads.

Guardian announces “free” downloadable printed edition

Another internet initiative has been announced by the Guardian. From later this summer an eight to 12 page A4 printable edition, updated every 15 minutes will be available from the Guardian Unlimited site.

G24 is being sponsored by BT, the telecoms business, and will be aimed at commuters. The “free service” is not quite so free as Metro when the transferred cost of printing is taken into account but it will be more up-to-date.

Comments by editor Alan Rusbridger seem to link it to the recent “web first” policy when he says: “Increasingly, readers are demanding editorial content tailored to the time and place of their choosing, rather than to artificial deadlines dictated by old print production schedules.”

Accodting to chief executive Carolyn McCall, quoted by UK Press Gazette, it will meet the “changing needs of our online users and readers”.

There is an example front page available on the page making the announcement. But it contradicts the copy by clearly not being A4 in size, wasting trees with huge top and bottom margins when printed. Looks rather like an announcement that has been rushed.

Guardian announces "free" downloadable printed edition

Another internet initiative has been announced by the Guardian. From later this summer an eight to 12 page A4 printable edition, updated every 15 minutes will be available from the Guardian Unlimited site.

G24 is being sponsored by BT, the telecoms business, and will be aimed at commuters. The “free service” is not quite so free as Metro when the transferred cost of printing is taken into account but it will be more up-to-date.

Comments by editor Alan Rusbridger seem to link it to the recent “web first” policy when he says: “Increasingly, readers are demanding editorial content tailored to the time and place of their choosing, rather than to artificial deadlines dictated by old print production schedules.”

Accodting to chief executive Carolyn McCall, quoted by UK Press Gazette, it will meet the “changing needs of our online users and readers”.

There is an example front page available on the page making the announcement. But it contradicts the copy by clearly not being A4 in size, wasting trees with huge top and bottom margins when printed. Looks rather like an announcement that has been rushed.

Newspapers are finding their citizen journalism roots

Newspapers can do citizen journalism too. Take this from the East Anglian Daily Times today:

Eye

Town Hall Clock: The town hall clock in Eye, which has been out of action for several weeks should be working again by the weekend. Richard Dinnin, chairman of the town hall working party, said the clock had been fitted with auto winders but after being started had stopped after 25 minutes due to an electrical fault.

Recent wind and rain had held up the rest of the work, which included repairs to the plinth, striker and weather vane but it was hoped all would be in order for the open gardens event.

The column-and-a-half under the Eye heading has eight items including a bowls match, an exhibition of children’s art and a Women’s Institute outing. It is part of the five page EACommunity section (no uploaded to the web) in the recently redesigned Archant-owned regional morning based in Ipswich, Suffolk.

Mostly it is tight packed items with no headlines other than the name of the village but each page has a larger story with a contributed picture. Only an item about a charity walk at the front of the section has staff pix.

Norwich-based Archant is seeing its future as local as it expands out of its eastern base buying up weekly newspapers (free and paid) and local magazines from Scotland to the West Country and London. The Eastern Daily Press in Norwich is now England’s largest circulation morning paper produced outside London.

In truth, there is nothing new about citizen journalism in newspapers. It is just that newspapers have lost sight of their readers in the past 30 or 40 years.
Before that, local papers were full of submitted copy from clubs and associations and most employed penny-a-line correspondents in villages. The headlines had active verbs and told you what the story was about.

In the early days of newspapers, stories were really letters, and we still use the word correspondent. People in towns across the land were writing letters to the London papers as were merchants and army officers around the world. Slowly journalism became a regular occupation, but the origins of our trade was in the bloggers and citizen journalists of the day.

Somehow as we fought the competition of radio and TV, news values changed and we lost sight of the importance of proximity at its base-level in streets and villages.

Under the influence (threat might be a better word) of the internet newspapers are starting to rediscover the importance of the proximity of news in holding readers.

What does OSM mean?

A blurb in today’s Guardian promises a big treat next Monday — a special supplement on “Changing media in OSM.” And it’s free.

But what in cyberspace does OSM mean? The first page of a Google search for “OSM” produced some possibilities: Open Street Map, Open Services Model, Ontological Sketch Model, Online Soccer Manager, Ottery Sports Centre, Operational Support Manager and Operations Support Management.

A search of Guardian Unlimited produced only one solution. Observer Sports Monthy is regularly so abbreviated.

Nothing seemed to relate to the evolution of digital media which is what we are waiting for next week.

The Guardian’s own style book wisely suggests spelling out less well-known abbreviations on first mention.

Dog eats dog mystery

While Peter Preston rails at the Independent under the heading “Indy suffers a list into silly survey country” in his Observer media column today, the main news section devotes nigh on a page to a survey of the top 40 crazes that made the 1980s.

It reveals the decade was shaped by Rubik’s Cube at number one, followed by legwarmers and Pacman.

The Independent on Thursay chose the Sutton Trust report claiming increased numbers of privately educated people in the top echelon of British media for one of its idiosyncratic fronts (graphic of statistics on an old school tie).

Now, Preston makes some good points about the Sutton Trust survey, questioning the way in which the top hundred people were selected, both for the new figures and the 1986 comparison data. He suggests the Indy editor (Simon Kelner, a grammar school boy) did not “read the small print”.
Is he going to voice the same doubts about The Observer’s commentator Will Hutton. He uses the Sutton report today as the peg for a think piece saying “the power of the old school tie has never been stronger and more damaging to society as a whole.”

I suspect that Kelner and Hutton both grasped the survey as a way of expressing a viewpoint they already held strongly. I certainly did in my post when I put forward very much the same case as I did in a conversation over coffee with Peter Preston a few months ago.

Mystery deepens

I am unable to link to Peter’s piece because only three of the four items in his column have been uploaded to the web. And which one is missing? The one headlined “Indy suffers…” of course.

Is this just a cockup or was the piece pulled after the first edition which I see in Suffolk? An email seeking guidance has been sent.

Guardian has ‘crossed a line’

After four days of the Guardian’s “web first” policy Harriet Sherwood, the foreign editor, today (Saturday) writes about the “modest start” they have made. In the Editor’s week slot she says the significance should not be underestimated. “We have crossed a line — and two things are inescapable: other newspapers will follow, and there is no going back,” she says.

There have been some problems with processes set up in advance not quite fitting reality and practical issues which had not been anticipated. But that was to be expected. The new “web first” policy only affects foreign and City desks at present and some commentators such as Steffen Fjaervik in his rather doubting post at the Poynter Institute have ignored the implications of this.

Foreign and financial news often cannot be used in a London-based paper until long after the event. Sherwood points out that on Wednesday they were able to post on Guardian Unlimited their story on the release of Islamic cleric Abu Bakar Ba’asyir from an Indonesian jail at 11.15am. The copy would have been old by the time it could appear in the following day’s printed edition.

Stories from Asia, Africa and the Middle East are most likely to be published earliest in the UK day. Sherwood says reporters in those areas are getting used to a different pattern of working. And she is adamant that quality will not be sacrificed for speed.

I expect there will be a lot more organisational, quality and commercial issues to be faced in the coming weeks and, inevitably, turf skirmishes if not wars.

Guardian has 'crossed a line'

After four days of the Guardian’s “web first” policy Harriet Sherwood, the foreign editor, today (Saturday) writes about the “modest start” they have made. In the Editor’s week slot she says the significance should not be underestimated. “We have crossed a line — and two things are inescapable: other newspapers will follow, and there is no going back,” she says.

There have been some problems with processes set up in advance not quite fitting reality and practical issues which had not been anticipated. But that was to be expected. The new “web first” policy only affects foreign and City desks at present and some commentators such as Steffen Fjaervik in his rather doubting post at the Poynter Institute have ignored the implications of this.

Foreign and financial news often cannot be used in a London-based paper until long after the event. Sherwood points out that on Wednesday they were able to post on Guardian Unlimited their story on the release of Islamic cleric Abu Bakar Ba’asyir from an Indonesian jail at 11.15am. The copy would have been old by the time it could appear in the following day’s printed edition.

Stories from Asia, Africa and the Middle East are most likely to be published earliest in the UK day. Sherwood says reporters in those areas are getting used to a different pattern of working. And she is adamant that quality will not be sacrificed for speed.

I expect there will be a lot more organisational, quality and commercial issues to be faced in the coming weeks and, inevitably, turf skirmishes if not wars.

The English Broadcasting Corporation?

It will probably puzzle anyone outside the UK but the BBC has come under fire for being being too biased in favour of England in the World Cup.

The attack came from Jack McConnell, First Minister of Scotland, who according to the Scotsman (requires free registration) said on a radio phone-in the BBC seem “to forget from time to time that they are meant to represent the whole of the country, not just one part of it. I hope perhaps they will listen to a bit of pressure and be more reasonable with their coverage.”

McConnell, who heads the devolved Scottish Parliament, had earlier said he would be supporting Trinidad and Tobago. There has also been strong support for T&T in Wales, where one of the Carribean stars plays for Wrexham.